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Are cats allergic to Hydrangea or is it toxic to them?

Gothic-style illustration of a Hydrangea plant

Hydrangea plants, known for their colorful clusters of flowers, can be toxic to cats if ingested. While not technically an allergy, consuming parts of the hydrangea plant can cause poisoning in felines. These popular garden shrubs contain cyanogenic glycosides, which release cyanide when metabolized in the body, potentially leading to serious health issues.

Hydrangeas are commonly found in landscaping and as decorative cut flowers in homes.

Toxicity level

Moderate

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Additional image of the plant

Symptoms your cat may have

If a cat has ingested parts of a hydrangea plant, they may exhibit various symptoms of poisoning. These can include:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea, which may contain blood
  • Abdominal pain and discomfort
  • Lethargy and depression
  • Difficulty breathing (dyspnea)
  • In severe cases, seizures or coma

Potential diagnosis your Vet may give

If you suspect your cat has consumed hydrangea, it’s crucial to seek veterinary care promptly. Your veterinarian will likely perform the following steps to diagnose hydrangea poisoning:

  1. Conduct a thorough physical examination to assess your cat’s overall health and note any visible symptoms.
  2. Obtain a detailed history of your cat’s recent activities, including any exposure to plants or outdoor access.
  3. Perform blood tests and a biochemical profile to evaluate organ function and check for any abnormalities.
  4. Carry out a urinalysis to assess kidney function and check for signs of toxicity.
An illustrative banner depicting an anthropomorphic cat in a vet's office, alongside a call-to-action message that reads: 'If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic substance,' accompanied by a prominent button stating 'Find A Vet Near Me!
An illustrative banner depicting an anthropomorphic cat in a vet's office, alongside a call-to-action message that reads: 'If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic substance,' accompanied by a prominent button stating 'Find A Vet Near Me!

FAQ

Q: Is Hydrangea toxic to cats?

A: Yes, Hydrangea is toxic to cats. Ingesting this plant can cause symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, and drooling.

Q: What are the symptoms of Hydrangea poisoning in cats?

A: Symptoms of Hydrangea poisoning in cats include vomiting, diarrhea, and lethargy. Cats may also experience drooling and lack of appetite.

Q: How can I treat Hydrangea poisoning in cats?

A: If your cat has ingested Hydrangea, seek immediate veterinary care. Treatment often involves supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent dehydration.

Q: Are there other plants similar to Hydrangea that are toxic to cats?

A: Yes, other plants like Azaleas and Rhododendrons are also toxic to cats. It is important to keep these and other harmful plants out of reach of your pets.

Q: How can I prevent my cat from eating Hydrangea?

A: To prevent your cat from eating Hydrangea, place the plant in an area inaccessible to your cat or opt for pet-safe plants. Providing alternative chew toys and engaging activities can help deter your cat from chewing on houseplants.

Q: What should I do if my cat shows signs of poisoning after eating Hydrangea?

A: If your cat shows signs of poisoning after eating Hydrangea, contact your veterinarian immediately. Prompt treatment is crucial to alleviate symptoms and prevent serious health complications.

History of Hydrangea

Hydrangeas, belonging to the Saxifragaceae family, have been cultivated for centuries. Native to Asia and the Americas, these ornamental shrubs gained popularity during the 18th century in Europe. They were prized for their large, showy flower heads, which can range in color from white and pink to blue and purple, depending on soil pH.

Today, hydrangeas are widely grown in gardens worldwide and are also used as cut flowers in floral arrangements.

Further reading and sources

Please note: The information shared in this post is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as veterinary medical advice.

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