Fuzzytumz logo

Are cats allergic to Glacier Ivy or is it toxic to them?

Glacier Ivy depicted in Byzantine art style with intricate patterns.

Glacier ivy (Hedera helix), also known as English ivybranching ivyneedlepoint ivysweetheart ivy, and California ivy, is a common houseplant and outdoor ornamental vine.

While not technically an allergen, glacier ivy contains triterpenoid saponins that are toxic to cats if ingested. This plant is commonly found in hanging baskets, as ground cover, or climbing up walls and fences.

Toxicity level

Moderate

Search Through Our Comprehensive 300+
Toxic Plant Archive Today

Additional image of the plant

Symptoms your cat may have

If a cat ingests any part of a glacier ivy plant, especially the leaves, they may experience symptoms of toxicity. Common signs that your cat has been poisoned by glacier ivy include:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Hypersalivation (excessive drooling)
  • Pawing at the mouth or face
  • Reduced appetite
  • Lethargy

Potential diagnosis your Vet may give

If you suspect your cat has ingested glacier ivy, it’s important to contact your veterinarian immediately. Your vet will likely perform the following steps to diagnose glacier ivy poisoning:

  1. Perform a thorough physical exam
  2. Take a complete history, including any plants your cat may have access to
  3. Run bloodwork to check organ function and electrolyte levels
  4. Administer a urinalysis to assess kidney function
  5. Take radiographs (X-rays) if an obstruction from plant material is suspected

For more information on how glacier ivy affects cats, visit the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

An illustrative banner depicting an anthropomorphic cat in a vet's office, alongside a call-to-action message that reads: 'If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic substance,' accompanied by a prominent button stating 'Find A Vet Near Me!
An illustrative banner depicting an anthropomorphic cat in a vet's office, alongside a call-to-action message that reads: 'If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic substance,' accompanied by a prominent button stating 'Find A Vet Near Me!

FAQ

Q: Is Glacier Ivy safe for cats?

A: Glacier Ivy is not safe for cats as it contains toxic compounds. When ingested, it can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and other serious health issues in cats.

Q: What are the symptoms of Glacier Ivy poisoning in cats?

A: Symptoms of Glacier Ivy poisoning in cats include drooling, vomiting, and difficulty breathing. In severe cases, cats may experience lethargy and loss of appetite.

Q: How can I treat Glacier Ivy poisoning in cats?

A: If your cat has ingested Glacier Ivy, seek immediate veterinary care. Treatment often includes inducing vomiting and administering activated charcoal to absorb the toxins.

Q: Are there any plants similar to Glacier Ivy that are also toxic to cats?

A: Yes, many plants similar to Glacier Ivy, such as English Ivy and Devil’s Ivy, are also toxic to cats. Always ensure to keep these and other poisonous plants out of your home if you have pets.

Q: How can I prevent my cat from eating Glacier Ivy?

A: To prevent your cat from eating Glacier Ivy, keep the plant out of reach or opt for pet-safe plants instead. Providing your cat with plenty of toys and distractions can also reduce their interest in chewing on plants.

Q: What should I do if my cat shows signs of poisoning after eating Glacier Ivy?

A: If your cat shows signs of poisoning after eating Glacier Ivy, contact your veterinarian immediately. Quick action can be crucial in mitigating the effects of the toxins.

History of the Glacier Ivy

Hedera helix is an evergreen climbing vine native to Europe, Western Asia, and North Africa. It was brought to North America by colonial settlers and has been widely planted as an ornamental groundcover.

Glacier ivy is a popular cultivar admired for its variegated leaves with white margins.In its native habitat, glacier ivy serves as an important food source for birds and pollinators. However, it has also been recognized as an invasive species in some areas, as its dense growth can crowd out native vegetation.

Further reading and sources

Please note: The information shared in this post is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as veterinary medical advice.

Hit the kitty paws and help increase worldwide cat karma!

305