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Are cats allergic to Ambrosia Mexicana?

Illustration of an Ambrosia Mexicana plant in Ukiyo-e style

Ambrosia Mexicana, also known as Jerusalem Oak or Feather Geranium, is a highly toxic plant for cats. This plant contains sesquiterpene lactones, which can cause severe poisoning in felines.

Ambrosia Mexicana is commonly found in sandy washes, disturbed areas, and rock crevices in the deserts of northern Mexico, Arizona, and California

Toxicity level

High

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Symptoms your cat may have

If a cat ingests any part of the Ambrosia Mexicana plant, it may experience various symptoms due to the toxic sesquiterpene lactones.

Common symptoms include:

 

  • Vomiting
  • Anorexia (loss of appetite)
  • Depression
  • Rapid breathing
  • Labored breathing
  • Dark colored mucous membranes
  • Weakness
  • Sleepiness
  • Tremors
  • Ataxia (lack of muscle control)
  • Staggering gait
  • Dark or brown colored blood
  • Seizures
  • Cardiac irregularities
  • Hypocalcemia (low calcium levels)
  • Coma
  • In severe cases, death

Potential diagnosis your Vet may give

If you suspect your cat has ingested Ambrosia Mexicana, it is crucial to take them to a veterinarian immediately. The vet will likely perform the following steps to diagnose and treat the poisoning:

  1. Conduct a physical examination and review the cat’s medical history.
  2. Perform diagnostic tests such as a complete blood count (CBC), biochemical profile, urinalysis, and fecal examination.
  3. Confirm the diagnosis based on the presence of sesquiterpene lactones in the plant and the cat’s symptoms.
  4. Provide supportive care, which may include inducing vomiting, administering activated charcoal, providing intravenous fluids, and monitoring vital signs.

For more information on the diagnosis and treatment of Ambrosia Mexicana poisoning in cats, visit the ASPCA

An illustrative banner depicting an anthropomorphic cat in a vet's office, alongside a call-to-action message that reads: 'If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic substance,' accompanied by a prominent button stating 'Find A Vet Near Me!
An illustrative banner depicting an anthropomorphic cat in a vet's office, alongside a call-to-action message that reads: 'If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic substance,' accompanied by a prominent button stating 'Find A Vet Near Me!

FAQ

Q: Are cats allergic to Ambrosia Mexicana?

A: Yes, cats can be allergic to Ambrosia Mexicana. Allergic reactions in cats may include symptoms such as itching, sneezing, and skin irritation.

Q: What are the symptoms of Ambrosia Mexicana poisoning in cats?

A: Symptoms of Ambrosia Mexicana poisoning in cats can include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, and difficulty breathing. If you suspect your cat has ingested this plant, seek veterinary care immediately.

Q: How can I prevent my cat from being exposed to Ambrosia Mexicana?

A: To prevent exposure, ensure Ambrosia Mexicana is not present in your home or garden. Keep your cat indoors or supervise outdoor activities to avoid contact with this plant.

Q: What should I do if my cat has ingested Ambrosia Mexicana?

A: If your cat has ingested Ambrosia Mexicana, contact your veterinarian immediately. Do not attempt to induce vomiting unless directed by a professional.

Q: Is Ambrosia Mexicana commonly found in gardens?

A: Ambrosia Mexicana, also known as Mexican Ragweed, is commonly found in gardens and wild areas. It is important to identify and remove this plant if you have cats.

Q: Can Ambrosia Mexicana cause long-term health issues in cats?

A: Prolonged exposure or ingestion of Ambrosia Mexicana can potentially lead to long-term health issues in cats, including chronic respiratory problems and gastrointestinal distress.

History of The Ambrosia Mexicana

Ambrosia Mexicana, a member of the Chenopodiaceae family, was formerly classified in the Ambrosia genus. This plant has been used by various Native American tribes for medicinal purposes.

The Seri people smoked its dried leaves and used the roots to make medicinal teas and pigments. However, despite its historical use, Ambrosia Mexicana is now recognized as a toxic plant for cats and other animals

Further reading and sources

Please note: The information shared in this post is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as veterinary medical advice.

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